College or career? It’s not just about grades anymore. 

Our efforts to provide career exploration and inspire data-driven career choices are mission critical to economic stability.

Did you know?

42%

42% of recent college graduates work in jobs that do not require a college degree.

Federal Reserve Bank of New York

79%

79% of 18 to 29-year-olds agreed that “it is more important to enjoy my job than to make a lot of money.”

Clark University Poll of Emerging Adults

47%

47% of employed Americans say their job is just what they do for a living.

Pew Research Center

What does this mean for high schoolers?

With record-high graduation rates, along with the largest decrease of those graduates applying to college, many of them elected not to attend college without any career exploration. In the aggregate, a continuous introduction of high school graduates into the workforce without clear, actionable career interests will inevitably lead to a decrease of productivity in the form of high turnover—and driven by un-fulfillment.

What does this mean for college students?

For those high school graduates that do attend college, we strongly believe that their lack of career exploration is playing a major role of why half of them have jobs that do not require a degree. The absence of clear, actionable career interests before applying to college often leads to multiple degree-major changes and unnecessary student loan debt.

What does this mean for everyday people?

Although well intended, the rush to equip the unemployed and underemployed with technical skills and specialized training without career exploration is shortsighted. While many may celebrate an expedited workforce, we caution long-term attrition, flat retention rates, and wasted resources. In many cases, the gratefulness of obtaining a new skill and employment from new hires is often confused with having relief from the pressure of needing any type of job.